VERMONT GLOVE

The Revival of Green Mountain Glove Company

When I was 10yrs. old I remember my great Uncle Kurt Sr. bringing my parents and I to his glove factory to get some maple syrup and goat leather for my slingshot. Fast forward 20+ years later, I found myself back in Randolph, VT on a Friday afternoon wondering if I could find the old glove factory. A quick left on Pearl St., past a 3 story tall smokestack was Green Mountain Glove Company, now Vermont Glove. As I pulled into the parking lot memories of the building came rushing back. I took a walk around the building to find the new owner of Vermont Glove, Sam Hooper. Excited to show me around, he took me on my journey down memory lane. Corona’s in hand, I toured the factory floor (which looks exactly how I remember it), observed the ongoing improvements to the building, and got the rundown of what goes into making the best utility gloves on the market.

Sam Hooper, seeing the potential in this 99 yr. old glove company, bought Green Mountain Glove Company in 2018. Since owning Vermont Glove, Sam has already made this old milk creamery plant net-zero, running on 100% renewable energy (solar panels on the roof and a wood pellet heating system), made operational efficiencies, created a new identity and website www.vermontglove.com, and has expanded their reach within the trades and consumer business. He is not only determined to make this company last another 100 yrs. he has goals to bring back the textile workforce in Vermont and guide this company into the future. Below are some shots of how Vermont Glove makes their incredible products.

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Exterior of Vermont Glove. A new loading bay is being installed to increase shipping efficiency.

Front Entrance still bares the original Green Mountain Glove Company sign.

Front Entrance still bares the original Green Mountain Glove Company sign.

Originally the Whiting Milk Creamery Plant.

Originally the Whiting Milk Creamery Plant.

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The production floor uses sewing machines from the 1900’s modified with new clutches and motors. They just don’t make them like they used to!

The production floor uses sewing machines from the 1900’s modified with new clutches and motors. They just don’t make them like they used to!

Original machines still in use today.

Original machines still in use today.

Vermont Glove’s new branding.

Vermont Glove’s new branding.

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These iron hands heat up the leather to help shape the gloves. Definitely creeped me out as a kid!

These iron hands heat up the leather to help shape the gloves. Definitely creeped me out as a kid!

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These presses are used to cut out all the glove pieces.

These presses are used to cut out all the glove pieces.

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Industrial press is used to cut through multiple layers of fabric. Its original use was for cutting newspaper.

Industrial press is used to cut through multiple layers of fabric. Its original use was for cutting newspaper.

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The final product. “Tough gloves that are easy on the hands”

The final product. “Tough gloves that are easy on the hands”